Current Exhibits

SEEDSCAPES: FUTURE-PROOFING NATURE

Dornith Doherty, Sant Khalsa, Chrystel Lebas, Heidi Morstang, Liz Orton

From Scottish shorelines to Arctic seed vaults, five contemporary artists explore global efforts to save plants from extinction. Plant diversity is threatened by global warming, pollution and war. Yet without seeds and their potential for food and medicine, we cannot sustain ourselves.

Dornith Doherty documents seed banks around the world, using scientific imaging to reveal seeds in ‘suspended animation’. Sant Khalsa responds to the plight of forest fires and deforestation in California. Chrystel Lebas follows in the footsteps of botanist E.J. Salisbury, photographing natural habitats almost a hundred years later. Liz Orton goes behind the scenes at the Herbarium at Kew, while Heidi Morstang journeys to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in the Arctic Norwegian Archipelago.

Featuring photography, moving image and sculpture, Seedscapes will capture the imagination of anyone interested in art, nature, and the future of our planet.

Seedscapes: Future-Proofing Nature is curated by Liz Wells with creative producer Pippa Oldfield.  An Impressions Gallery touring exhibition curated by Liz Wells in association with The Dick Institute and Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a programme of activities to bring the magic of seeds and the natural world to our audiences and communities. In-gallery and ‘take-home’ creative activities will appeal to curious minds and those looking to appreciate earth’s plant diversity, and we are inviting East Ayrshire primary schools to get involved by posting out our special exhibition activity packs to schools.

There’s also the chance to take part in an innovative photography exhibition engagement project for young people, led by award-winning photographer Alicia Bruce and supported by the National Lottery through Creative Scotland.

 

Over two workshop weekends in October participants will work with Alicia to explore our relationship to nature and the climate crisis through photography, biodiversity and activism at the Dick Institute and Dean Castle Country Park.  The project culminates in a week of exhibitions and art presentations during COP26 this November.

For more info and to find out how to get involved, contact Geraldine.greene@eastayrshireleisure.com

Image: Husk Corn From the series Archiving Eden (2008-2017) © Dornith Doherty

MY TRIBE & ME, MYSELF & I

A showcase exhibition exploring self-expression and identity with artwork created by over 80 young people from East Ayrshire continues until 23 October.

These works were made as a result of visual art engagement projects responding to two exhibitions: Grayson Perry, The Vanity of Small Differences and Claude Cahun, Beneath this Mask, as part of the East Ayrshire Leisure exhibition programme.

My Tribe

Park School, Kilmarnock and Grange Academy pupils

Pupils were invited to create a piece of personal artwork in response to Grayson Perry, The Vanity of Small Differences, an Arts Council Touring exhibition exploring group identities through objects, choices, tribes and belonging.

My Tribe is a collection of artworks providing a snapshot impression of the objects through which these young people choose to express their identities today. This project ran in Autumn 2020, when schools were unable to visit galleries due to the pandemic.  A unique blended learning exhibition box was posted out, bringing a colourful creative experience direct to the classroom with digital and physical art resources.

 Me, Myself & I

Celebrating the Claude Cahun, Beneath This Mask exhibition shown in the Main Gallery over Summer 2021, we invited young people to submit their smartphone selfie-expressive snaps to be exhibited as works of art in the gallery.

Following themes of self-expression and transformation, these self-portraits show how the photographer presents themselves to the world and experiment with identity and style through makeup, props and backgrounds.

New exhibits have been added to the Johnnie Walker display in the Dick Institute's South Museum.