Core Paths

The Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 places a number of duties on local authorities, one of which is to produce a Core Paths Plan. This duty ensures that local authorities provide a system of paths that will give the public reasonable access through and across the surrounding landscape. East Ayrshire’s Core Path Plan was adopted on 5 November 2008 and has recently been updated in the form of a Recreation Plan 

Although there is no specific standard for core paths, here in East Ayrshire, we view them as strategic routes that connect a network of destinations, settlements, towns and communities. Core paths are the links that the people of East Ayrshire will regularly use for journeys such as travelling to work, for visiting family and friends, or for visiting neighbouring towns and communities. They will also be used for recreational activities.

Throughout Scotland core paths will generally be designed as shared use and suitable for all walkers, cyclists and horse riders; however not all of them will be suitable for every ability which can be due to location or proximity to livestock. There will be some on water to provide recreational opportunities to kayakers and canoeists.

In essence, a core path is chosen not for how many people are able to use it or for its physical quality, but instead for the value of its location and route destination. They must be of significant value to visitors, local communities and land owners.

Click the links below to view more information on individual Core Paths within East Ayrshire.